The Lab

The Lab is a nonprofit experimental art and performance space located in the Mission District of San Francisco.

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Art & Dialogue: Helen Molesworth in conversation with Julia Bryan-Wilson

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Talk starts at 5:30pm
Free

Join Artadia, Helen Molesworth, Chief Curator at The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Los Angeles, and Julia Bryan-Wilson, Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art at the University of California, Berkeley, for a free public program at The Lab. Molesworth will visit San Francisco to participate in Art & Dialogue and visit with Artadia Awardees.

Helen Molesworth is the Chief Curator at The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Los Angeles, where she recently curated the first US retrospective of the Brazilian artist Anna Maria Maiolino and the monographic survey Kerry James Marshall: Mastry.  From 2010–2014 she was the Barbara Lee Chief Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) Boston, where she assembled one person exhibitions of artists Steve Locke, Catherine Opie, Josiah McElheny, and Amy Sillman, and the group exhibitions Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933–1957, Dance/Draw, and This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.  As head of the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Harvard Art Museum, she presented an exhibition of photographs by Moyra Davey and ACT UP NY: Activism, Art, and the AIDS Crisis 1987–1993.  From 2002–2007 she was the Chief Curator of Exhibitions at the Wexner Center for the Arts, where she organized the first US retrospectives of Louise Lawler and Luc Tuymans, as well as Part Object Part Sculpture, which examined the influence of Marcel Duchamp’s erotic objects. While Curator of Contemporary Art at The Baltimore Museum of Art from 2000–2002, she arranged Work Ethic, which traced the problem of artistic labor in post-1960s art.  She is the author of numerous catalog essays and her writing has appeared in publications such as Artforum, Art Journal, Documents, and October.  The recipient of the 2011 Bard Center for Curatorial Studies Award for Curatorial Excellence, she is currently at work on an ambitious exhibition inspired by the American painter and film critic Manny Farber and his 1962 essay “White Elephant vs. Termite Art.”

Julia Bryan-Wilson is Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art at the University of California, Berkeley and Director of Berkeley's Arts Research Center. Her research interests include questions of artistic labor, feminism, queer theory, fabrication/production, performance, visual culture of the nuclear age, photography, and textile handicraft. She is the author of Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era (U California Press, 2009), Art in the Making: Artists and their Materials from the Studio to Crowdsourcing (with Glenn Adamson, Thames & Hudson, 2016), and Fray: Art and Textile Politics (U Chicago, 2017).  She is the editor of Robert Morris: October Files (MIT, 2013), and she has co-edited two special issues of journals: “Visual Activism” for the Journal of Visual Culture (with Jennifer González and Dominic Willsdon) and “Time Zones: Durational Art and its Contexts” for Representations (with Shannon Jackson). With Andrea Andersson, Bryan-Wilson co-curated the exhibition Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen, which travels to the Berkeley Art Museum in fall 2018.  She is currently writing a book about Louise Nevelson.

Art & Dialogue is a national program designed to expand support for Artadia’s growing network of Awardees. Artadia currently supports over 300 Awardees working in a diverse array of disciplines in 7 cities across the country. Developed through in-depth research of artists’ needs, Art & Dialogue bridges connections between visual artists, curators and diverse publics in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco through a series of studio visits, public programs, and online engagement.

Artadia is a national non-profit organization that supports visual artists with unrestricted, merit-based awards and fosters connections to a network of opportunities. In the past 18 years, Artadia has awarded over $3 million to more than 300 artists throughout its participating award cities of Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco.

http://artadia.org/programs/art-dialogue/